Mezzanine Barriers To Critical Thinking

1 Barriers to critical thinking

First, let’s briefly examine some barriers to critical thinking.

Take another look at the visual summary below on critical and analytical thinking, which was introduced at the end of Session 3. Note the warning sign next to the ‘black pit’ to the lower right of this figure.

Figure 1 A visual summary of critical and analytical thinking

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What are the common pitfalls or barriers to thinking critically and analytically? Some of these were highlighted in the visual summary, and include:

  • Misunderstanding. This can arise due to language or cultural differences, a lack of awareness of the ‘processes’ involved, or a misunderstanding that critical thinking means making ‘negative’ comments (as discussed in Sessions 3 and 4).
  • Reluctance to critique the ‘norm’ or experts in a field and consider alternative views (feeling out of your ‘comfort zone’ or fearful of being wrong).
  • Lack of detailed knowledge. Superficial knowledge (not having read deeply enough around the subject).
  • Wanting to know the answers without having to ask questions.

Why do you think being aware of these potential pitfalls is important?

As a critical and reflective thinker, you will need to be aware of the barriers, acknowledge the challenges they may present, and overcome these as best you can. This starts with an understanding of expectations. Some students feel anxious about questioning the work of experts. Critical thinking does not mean that you are challenging someone’s work or telling them that they are wrong, but encourages a deeper understanding, a consideration of alternative views, and engagement in thought, discourse or research that informs your independent judgement. At postgraduate level you will also need to read widely around a subject in order to engage effectively with critical and analytical thinking, and to ask questions: there are no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ answers, only supported arguments. This is at the heart of postgraduate study.

Critical thinking encourages you to be constructive, by considering the strengths and weaknesses of a claim and differing sides to an argument. It helps you to clarify points, encourages deeper thought, and allows you to determine whether information that you come across is accurate and reliable. This helps you to form your own judgement, and drives research forward.

People can find it difficult to think critically, irrespective of their education or intellectual ability. The key to understanding critical thinking is not only knowing and making sure that you understand the process, but also being able to put this into practice by applying your knowledge.

Critical and reflective thinking are complex and lifelong skills that you continue to develop as part of your personal and professional growth. In your everyday life, you may also come across those who do not exercise critical thinking, and this might impact on decisions that affect you. It is important to recognise this, and to use critical and reflective thinking to ensure that your own view is informed by reasoned judgement, supported by evidence.

Take another look at the visual summary. You will see two aspects to critical thinking: one focusing on the disposition of the person engaged in critical and reflective thinking, and the other concerning their abilities. Let’s focus here on dispositions. At a personal level, barriers to critical thinking can arise through:

  • an over-reliance on feelings or emotions
  • self-centred or societal/cultural-centred thinking (conformism, dogma and peer-pressure)
  • unconscious bias, or selective perception
  • an inability to be receptive to an idea or point of view that differs from your own (close-mindedness)
  • unwarranted assumptions or lack of relevant information
  • fear of being wrong (anxious about being taken out of your ‘comfort zone’)
  • poor communication skills or apathy
  • lack of personal honesty.

Be aware that thinking critically is not simply adhering to a formula. For example, reflect on the following questions:

  • How can you communicate with those who do not actively engage with critical thinking and are unwilling to engage in a meaningful dialogue?
  • How would you react or respond when you experience a lack of critical thinking in the media, amongst your own family members, colleagues at work, or on your course?

Essay about Barriers and Obstacles to Critical Thinking

728 WordsMay 27th, 20123 Pages

Barriers and Obstacles to Critical Thinking
Your Name
PHL 251
March 21, 2011
Philip Reynolds

Barriers and Obstacles to Critical Thinking Critical thinking helps thinkers to act instead of reacting. Reacting results in hasty decisions that are not always well thought-out. Quick decisions can lead to error or cause more problems. Evaluating decision is important to the decision-making process. During reflections a thinker can rethink what the outcome was and if the problem could have been addressed in a better manner. By evaluating decisions a thinker is learning what works and what does not work, therefore, fostering successful problem- solving and decision-making skills. However, critical thinking can be damaged or affected by…show more content…

The understanding of others is a welcomed benefit.
Although experience is a wonderful teacher, if it is filtered through a biased or distorted view, that is how it is remembered. Self- delusion supports self-delusion. Create an open mind and question logic by asking again and again, “Am I thinking logically and rationally”. This is called a sanity check. Another good sanity check is choosing friends and colleagues who will speak truthfully, not just echoing words of affirmation. These friends are priceless as sounding boards for stream of thought and rational thinking.
Scheduled pressure can be an enemy of sound critical thinking. They can lead to cutting corners which may lead to making mistakes and poor decision making. Stress can also lead to mistakes and bad decision making. Procrastination at time is result of not knowing where to start can result in more stress and cutting corners. To overcome this barrier is as simple as proper planning and execution.
Group thinking is danger to critical thinking. Critical thinking by its very nature questions ideas, opinions, and thoughts of oneself and others. It uses internal and external reflection. Sources include radio, television, newspaper, magazines and the internet to reflect what is called normal thinking. Questioning the source and what heard are ways to demonstrate critical thinking skills. Being a thinker takes conscious and constant

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