Asko Parpola Bibliography Meaning

Hinduism has two major roots. The more familiar is the religion brought to South Asia in the second millennium BCE by speakers of Aryan or Indo-Iranian languages, a branch of the Indo-European language family. Another, more enigmatic, root is the Indus civilization of the third millennium BCE, which left behind thousands of short inscriptions in a forgotten pictographic script, difficult to decipher in the absence of bilinguals. The author of this book spent fifty years researching these roots. This book traces the Aryan migrations from their original homeland north of the Black Sea through th ... More

Hinduism has two major roots. The more familiar is the religion brought to South Asia in the second millennium BCE by speakers of Aryan or Indo-Iranian languages, a branch of the Indo-European language family. Another, more enigmatic, root is the Indus civilization of the third millennium BCE, which left behind thousands of short inscriptions in a forgotten pictographic script, difficult to decipher in the absence of bilinguals. The author of this book spent fifty years researching these roots. This book traces the Aryan migrations from their original homeland north of the Black Sea through the Eurasian steppes to Central, West, and South Asia. Among many other things, it discusses the profound impact of the invention of the horse-drawn chariot on Indo-Aryan religion, and presents new ideas on the origin and formation of Vedic literature and rites, and the great epics. Previously, it has been argued that the Indus people spoke a Dravidian language, and that the Indus script mentions God Murukan (Vedic Rudra and Hindu Skanda) and certain stars and planets with their Old Tamil names. These insights are developed here. But its main focus is on the West Asian pair of Mother Earth (lion) and Father Sky (bull), who, with their sacred marriage, were central in the Indus religion, too. This heritage lives on today in South Indian villages, and in Vedic and Tantric rites and myths, including that of Goddess Durgā and Mahiṣa.

Keywords: Hinduism, Aryan, Indo-Iranian, Indus civilization, chariot, Veda, Dravidian, Tantra, Goddess, sacred marriage

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2015Print ISBN-13: 9780190226909
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2015DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190226909.001.0001

Asko Parpola (born 1941) is a Finnish Indologist and Sindhologist, current professor emeritus of Indology and South Asian Studies at the University of Helsinki. He specializes in the Indus script.

Biography[edit]

Parpola is a brother of the Akkadian language epigrapher Simo Parpola.[1] He is married to Marjatta Parpola, who has authored a study on the traditions of Kerala's Nambudiri Brahmins.[2]

Scholarship[edit]

Parpola's research and teaching interests fall within the following topics:

  • Indus Civilization / Indus script and religion / Corpus of Indus Seals and Inscriptions
  • Veda / Vedic ritual / Samaveda / Jaiminiya Samaveda texts and rituals / Purva-Mimamsa
  • South Asian religions / Hinduism / Saiva and Sakta tradition / Goddess Durga
  • South India / Kerala / Tamil Nadu / Karnataka
  • Sanskrit / Malayalam / Kannada / Tamil / Prehistory of Indian languages
  • Prehistoric archaeology of South Asia and (in broad sense) Central Asia / Coming of the Aryans

Two significant contributions of Parpola, to the field of decipherment of the Indus script, are the creation of the now universally used classification of Indus valley seals, and the proposed, and much-debated, decipherment of the language of the script.[3]

Dravidian hypothesis[edit]

Main article: Indus script

According to Parpola the Indus script and Harappan language are "most likely to have belonged to the Dravidian family".[4][5] Parpola led a Finnish team in the 1960s-80s that vied with Knorozov's Soviet team in investigating the inscriptions using computer analysis. Based on a proto-Dravidian assumption, they proposed readings of many signs, some agreeing with the suggested readings of Heras and Knorozov (such as equating the "fish" sign with the Dravidian word for fish "min") but disagreeing on several other readings. A comprehensive description of Parpola's work until 1994 is given in his book Deciphering the Indus Script.[6]

Awards[edit]

Asko Parpola received the Kalaignar M. Karunanidhi Classical Tamil Award for 2009 on June 23, 2010 at the World Classical Tamil Conference at Coimbatore.

Publications[edit]

Books
  • 1994: Deciphering the Indus Script, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 9780521430791
  • 2015: The Roots of Hinduism: The Early Aryans and the Indus Civilization, Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-19-022692-3
Misc
  • 2008: Is the Indus script indeed not a writing system? In: Airāvati: Felicitation volume in honour of Iravatham Mahadevan: 111–31. VARALAARU.COM, Chennai.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

0 comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *